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Archive for the ‘1970s’ Category

Lee Perry & The Upsetters – Kentucky Skank (1973)

November 12, 2017 Leave a comment

This is a staggering, mesmerising record which has spaghetti western overtones and some mad sound effects that cut, crack, ring, spring, squeal, clatter, wash and bamboozle …. Lee Perry at the height of his powers!

Released on the Double Seven LP in 1973 (as was the previous post by David Isaacs), the guitar is funk perfection, the rocksteady beat relentless, the brass piercing. Over the top, Mr Perry freestyles his usual cut-up vocals that shouldn’t make sense but do …

 

Okay, Okay. Let’s take it from here

 

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David Isaacs & The Upsetters – Just Enough (To Keep Me Hanging On) (1971)

November 12, 2017 Leave a comment

Yet another outstanding record from possibly the greatest year in popular music history.

I re-stumbled on this while listening to the new Lee Perry double CD set The Trojan Albums Collection (1971-1973) – an absolutely outstanding compilation!

“Just Enough” is achingly lovely; David Isaacs croons gently over some wonderfully understated rocksteady. Produced by Lee Perry at his most reflective. Seems to have originally been released as a single in 1971 before appearing on the Lee Perry LP Double Seven in 1973. The latter is so good, that there will be another from it within the next hour or so …!

Settle back and enjoy the best 190 seconds you will spend today!

It’s true

You’ve got me wrapped around your finger

 

 

 

 

The Faces – Debris (1971)

October 19, 2017 Leave a comment

I’ve already posted The Faces performing pretty much the best song of all time here.

But this is right up there. And it’s another gem from 1971 (the best year of all time?)

Ronnie Lane is one of the greatest singer/songwriters of the last half century and “Debris” finds him at his most reflective.

I left you on the Debris
At the Sunday morning market
You were sorting through the odds and ends
You was looking for a bargain

I heard your footsteps at the front door
And that old familiar love song
Cause you knew you’d find me waiting there
At the top of the stairs

I went there and back
Just to see how far it was
And you, you tried to tell me
But I had to learn for myself

Rod Stewart provides backing vocals but can only dream of matching Ronnie Lane …

The LP version and then a great live version where “Debris” slides into “Ooh La La”

 

Tesfa-Maryam Kidane – Heywete (late 1960s/early 1970s)

October 12, 2017 Leave a comment

From Senegal to Ethiopia.

Difficult to find out too much about this record. It appears on Volume 10 of the peerless Ethiopiques series of CDs (I’m almost a completist, though we are now up to 30 volumes!)

A wonderfully laid-back and evocative instrumental with Kidane’s saxophone holding the whole thing together – understated bass and percussion underpin the melody.  a piano fills in the spaces until a stunning guitar solo prompts the bass to move into Afro-funk perfection! Beautiful.

The Stooges – T.V. Eye (1970)

October 10, 2017 Leave a comment

How has it taken me this long to elevate this to the pantheon of the bestmusicofalltime?

Iggy Pop and The Stooges make most of what became before or after irrelevant. Relentless, focused, stripped down to the minimum input required to achieve maximum effect.

It gets no better than this and the Sex Pistols et al were still at school!

Sometimes I wonder why I bother listening to anything else …..

Carlton Jackson – History/Dub History (1977)

June 15, 2017 Leave a comment

Working my way through a Lee “Scratch”Perry boxset, I stumbled upon this fantastic slice of roots reggae from 1977. Carlton Jackson was not a prolific singer but, in just over 8 minutes, he earns his spot in the pantheon of thebestmusicofalltime!

My Rough Guide To Reggae waxes lyrical about this song thus:

 

Just as notable an Upsetter release from 1977 was one of the first 12″ singles to appear in Jamaica. The top side, Carlton Jackson’s “History”, perfectly fused one of Scratch’s most serious rhythms with a lyric that exemplified the word “conscious”. Beginning with an account of how he was sold as a slave in Africa to a European and taken in chains to the Caribbean. the singer tackles the different versions of history to which he has been exposed.

 

Dave Barker and the Upsetters – Tight Spot (1970)

June 14, 2017 Leave a comment

Outstanding track produced by the always slightly unhinged Lee Perry!

One of many reggae tracks with a spaghetti western link. The spoken introduction is priceless and, on its own, elevates this tune to the pantheon of thebestmusicofalltime!

So you come to mash uppa the town, huh?

Well you’re in a tight spot, amigo!

Minimalist guitar over an understated bassline with horns and organs weaving patterns to mess with your mind.

 

 

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