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Archive for the ‘1970s’ Category

Neu! – Leb’ Wohl (1975)

August 29, 2016 Leave a comment

I’m struggling to understand why it has taken me so long to post anything by the incomparable Neu! on this blog. No matter, an omission now rectified.

Alongside Kraftwerk and Can, Neu! are my favourites among the wonderful Krautrock genre of the 1970s.

I “re-stumbled” upon this song today while listening to the four CD set “Who’s That Man. A Tribute To Conny Plank” – Conny Plank was the engineer on all Neu!’s LPs and also on numerous other classics by Kraftwerk, Harmonia, Cluster, Ash Ra Tempel, etc. This track is taken from Neu’s third LP “Neu! ’75

This is a beautiful piano based song which, until recently, I might have considered as a potential candidate for part of the soundtrack for my funeral … However, having recently started to work my way through Michel de Montaigne’s Essays (written in the 16th century), I have been persuaded that specifying the desired details of my funeral would be a pointless and egotistical imposition and burden on those who live on. Thus, the great essayist quotes Saint Augustine:

The arranging of funerals, the conditions of burials, the pomp of obsequies, are rather a consolation for the living than any help to the dead”

Anyway, a perfect record!

Plastic Bertrand – Ca Plane Pour Moi (1978)

June 13, 2016 Leave a comment

Quite simply the greatest achievement in Belgium’s history.

An all-time “comedy punk” classic – right up there with Jilted John’s “Jilted John” and Splodgenessabound’s “Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps Please” .

First heard on the back of the school bus in Hong Kong, this was the first track on the never surpassed punk compilation LP “20 of Another Kind” ..

Perfect pop music!

Bram Tchaikovsky – Girl Of My Dreams (1979)

June 11, 2016 Leave a comment

Couldn’t resist the segue from Pyotr to Bram ….

A powerpop classic and one of my favourite songs when I was 15. Peter Bramall was originally a member of The Motors and then left to forge a new career by forming Bram Tchaikovsky to a largely indifferent world.

Released as a single, “Girl of my Dreams” was taken from the Strange Man, Changed Man which appeared on the wonderful Radar Records label (home of Elvis Costello and Nick Lowe around that time).

Perfect pop music!

Eddie Curtis – The Louisville Lip (1971)

June 4, 2016 Leave a comment

A very sad day indeed for the world.

This song would have been worth posting on any day of any year but, today, it just has to be essential. A great song, which I first heard when I bought the superb compilation “Hits And Misses: Muhammed Ali And The Ultimate Sound Of Fistfighting” a few years ago (released on the wonderful Trikont label, details here)

I remember the “Thrilla in Manila” quite well because I was a young boy living in Hong Kong in 1975 in the same time zone as the Philippines. My mum was very excited and followed it avidly!

I’ve previously posted an Ali tribute here (using the medium of reggae) but Eddie Curtis’ “Louisville Lip” is a worthy addition to the bestmusicofalime.

Hawkwind – Motorhead (1975)

May 28, 2016 Leave a comment

Motorhead” was the last song Lemmy wrote before leaving Hawkwind to form Motorhead in 1975.

Originally appearing as the B-Side of Hawkwind’s “Kings of Speed” single, the original version of this song is notable for: (a) a stunning bass intro; (b) a fantastic violin solo, and; (c) the only known use of the word “parallelogram” in popular music …. Rock’n’roll indeed, Mr Kilmister!

Just in case …

 

Billy Cobham – Stratus (1973)

May 24, 2016 Leave a comment

There is a great deal of enjoyment to be taken from spotting the original from which a recent (ish!) record has been sampled or developed. For all who enjoy such pleasures, I submit to you the inspiration behind Massive Attack’s seminal “Safe From Harm” – the opening track  from their unimpeachable Blue Lines LP of 1991.

Billy Cobham had recorded with Miles Davis and the Mahavishnu Orchestra before finding time to record his first solo LP, Spectrum in 1973. This is blistering, ahem, jazz-funk – a perfect example of how every genre can deliver the goods when it wants to.

This version strips away the 3 minutes of noodling that precedes the river of bass kicking in …  the full version and the whole Spectrum LP are worth a listen!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

João Donato – Cala Boca Menino (1973)

January 10, 2016 Leave a comment

Trawling through the three volumes of the excellent “Blue Juice” compilations released in the mid 1990s, I stumbled upon this stone cold classic!

João Donato is a Brazilian jazz and bossa nova pianist who has released numerous LPs over the years since 1956. This track is taken from his 1973 album Quem é quem.

A beautifully understated funk groove is gradually supplemented by horns and then a rather baffling call and response set of vocals to reveal the perfect organic whole. The only flaw? It’s only two and a half minutes long! Just put it on repeat!

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