Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Country’

The Walkabouts – The Light Will Stay On (Country Mix) (1997)

July 17, 2017 Leave a comment

It’s been a tough few weeks.

I’ve been working hard applying for my dream job: polishing the CV, reading like crazy, practicing the spiel, etc.

Found out today that I didn’t get it – c’est la vie.

I need to decide now what to do next ….

Happily, I’d been trawling through my Walkabouts CDs over the last few days and stumbled upon this tonight. Just what I needed. A companion piece to The SmithsThere is a light that never goes out“?

A perfect record – altogether now:

 And long, after we’re gone

The lights will stay on

The lights will stay on

Indeed they will.

Advertisements

Creedence Clearwater Revival – Someday Never Comes (1972)

August 31, 2014 Leave a comment

Stumbled upon this track first thing this morning while surfing Spotify. Half a dozen listens later and it is rapidly escalated into the pantheon of thebestmusicofalltime!

A single from CCR’s final LP “Mardi Gras”, the motivation for the song is explained succinctly by composer John Fogerty:

“Someday Never Comes” is simply a song about my parents undergoing a divorce when I was a child and me not knowing many things. When my dad left me, he told me to be a man and someday I would understand everything. Now, I’m here basically repeating the same thing really. I had a son in 1966 and I went away when he was five years old or so and again told him “someday” he would understand everything. Really, all kids ask questions like “Daddy, when are we going fishing?” and parents always answer with “someday”, but in reality someday never comes and kids never learn what they’re supposed to learn

With a perfect chorus:

Well, I’m here to tell you now each and every mother’s son
You better learn it fast, you better learn it young
‘Cause ‘Someday’ never comes

 

 

Categories: 1970s, Country, Pop, Rock Tags: , ,

George Jones – A Good Year For The Roses (1970)

April 26, 2013 Leave a comment

Posted today following the news of George Jones’ passing at the age of 81.

For many people, George Jones will have first crossed their radar as a result of the stunning cover of this record by Elvis Costello on his “Almost Blue” LP (and single) of 1981.

Married to Tammy Wynette for a few years in the early 1970s, George Jones was one of the towering figures in the development of country music. A Good Year for the Roses is a superb record; paradoxically, not a George Jones penned original though his is the definitive reading!

Take it away George …

I can hardly bear the sight of lipstick on the cigarettes there in the ashtray

Lyin’ cold the way you left ’em, but at least your lips caressed them while you packed

And a lip-print on a half-filled cup of coffee that you poured and didn’t drink

But at least you thought you wanted it, that’s so much more than I can say for me ….

 

The Handsome Family – So Much Wine (2000)

December 20, 2012 Leave a comment

With Christmas nearly upon us, time to dust off the Yuletide hits.

As such, no better place to start than this slightly tenuous track by the always wonderful Handsome Family (previously posted here). Taken from their 5th studio LP “In The Air” released in 2000.

It begins thus ….

I had nothing to say on Christmas Day

When you threw all your clothes in the snow …..

And peaks with the chorus ….

Listen to me, Butterfly,

There’s only so much wine, you can drink, in one life

But it will never be enough, to save you from, the bottom of your glass.

The original LP version then a live version from 2010.

Jack Kittel – Psycho (1973)

June 10, 2012 Leave a comment

This is a very unusual and striking record. Country music has never been quite so direct before or since …..

I first heard this song when it was covered by Elvis Costello and released as an extra track on the CD reissue of his “Almost Blue” LP.

The song was actually written by Leon Payne around 1960 and was first recorded and released by Eddie Noack in 1968. However, the definitive version is this one, recorded by Jack Kittel in 1973.

Not quite a “murder ballad” in the traditional sense; more like a serial killer’s confession as Jack calmly describes a series of murders from the perspective of someone who doesn’t quite know what they are doing. This extract gives a feel for the mood of the song …

Oh you recall that little girl mama

I believe her name was Betty Clark

Oh don’t tell me that she’s dead mama

‘Cause I just saw her in the park

We were sitting on a bench mama

Thinking of a game to play

Seems I was holding a wrench mama

Then my mind just walked away

Just the track …

Cornershop – Good To Be On The Road Back Home Again (1997)

December 24, 2011 Leave a comment

Wonderful faux-country (a new genre!) drinking song from the fantastic “When I Was Born For the 7th Time” LP released in 1997.

Not as well known as “Brimful of Asha”; but should be.

Featuring Paula Frazer from former John Peel favourites Tarnation on joint vocal duties.

A universal truth never more relevant than at Christmas time – it’s good to be on the road back home again …….

Silver Jews – I Remember Me (2001)

June 11, 2011 Leave a comment

Gazelle like, I spring from the 20th century to the 21st century….

This really is one of the best records of all time. Sober, laconic lyrics set to a gently strummed guitar. A preposterous story that still manages to retain enough universal truths as to verge on the profound …..

The Silver Jews formed in 1989 and, in their original line up, featured Stephen Malkmus who went on to make Pavement one of the greatest bands of the last 20 years. This track is taken from the Silver Jews 4th LP “Bright Flight” released in 2001. The singer, composer and novelist David Berman has been the one constant presence in the Silver Jews line up. He unsuccessfully tried to commit suicide in 2003 and, fortunately, the Silver Jews went on to make two more LPs before finally disbanding in 2009.

Something about this track always reminds me of meeting my other half many years earlier.

I love the lyric ..

And they slowdanced so the needle wouldn’t skip

Until the room was filled with light

I have posted this before but the link was poor. This is simple but does the job.

%d bloggers like this: